Loch a' Chroisg

Written by Chris Thornton | 22nd of June 2023
Loch a' Chroisg drone photo

Heading west from Dingwall along the Gairloch road (A832), there is a lovely loch named "Loch a' Chroisg" or "Loch of the Crossing". It's possible it got this name from cattle drovers making their way from Wester Ross to Dingwall.

Loch a' Chroisg runs east to west for 3 miles (5 km) in Achnasheen and is a very picturesque small loch surrounded by the peaks of Sgurr-na-Vullin and Sgurr a'Mhuilinn. Loch a' Chroisg is the source of the River Bran, which winds down to Loch Achanalt in the east.

Loch a' Chroisg drone photo showing A832.

Loch a' Chroisg fishing

The loch is a popular fishing spot in northwest Scotland, with brown trout, perch and northern pike the most popular species caught. No permit is required to fish here. Another reason this loch is popular for fishing is the lack of midges, as it is quite exposed with no trees.

Loch a' Chroisg drone photo

Loch Crann at the far west side of the loch is also a hot spot for pike but is a bit of a trek from the main loch.

Wild camping at Loch a' Chroisg

Wild camping opportunities are ample here... tents only - no trees for hammocks here! You may need to camp some distance from the loch to find a flat spot amongst the heather.

Loch a' Chroisg drone photo showing A832.

Lochrosque Lodge

At the northeast side of Loch a' Chroisg was Lochrosque Lodge, a large manor house owned by Sir Arthur Bignold; he was a member of parliament and Chief of the Gaelic Society of Inverness in the early 1900s. The building no longer exists, with only a tiny part remaining and remnants of the walled garden.

There was a large searchlight mounted upon the tower of Lochrosque Lodge, used to look for deer for the following day's hunt. While passing the lodge during World War 1, Winston Churchhill saw this large searchlight and suspected it of being used to guide German bomber zeppelins to Loch Ewe. He entered the property with a band of armed men and disabled the light from further use during wartime.

Loch a' Chroisg drone photo showing A832.

Key information on Loch a' Chroisg

  • Loch a' Chroisg, also known as "Loch of the crossing," is located along the Gairloch road (A832), west of Dingwall.

  • It possibly got its name from cattle drovers moving from Wester Ross to Dingwall.

  • The loch stretches for 3 miles (5 km) from east to west in Achnasheen.

  • It is a small, picturesque loch encircled by the peaks of Sgurr-na-Vullin and Sgurr a'Mhuilinn.

  • Loch a' Chroisg is the source of the River Bran, which flows down to Loch Achanalt in the east.

  • The loch is a favoured fishing location in northwest Scotland, attracting anglers with brown trout, perch, and northern pike; no fishing permit is required.

  • The absence of midges due to the exposed location and lack of trees contributes to its popularity among fishermen.

  • Loch Crann, at the far west side of the loch, is a prime location for pike fishing, although it is a considerable distance from the main loch.

  • The area offers numerous opportunities for wild camping, although there are no trees for hammocks, and flat spots for tents might need to be sought some distance from the loch.

  • The northeastern side of Loch a' Chroisg once housed Lochrosque Lodge, a large manor owned by Sir Arthur Bignold.

Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed this very short article on one of Scotland's lesser-known lochs.

Photos courtesy of John Luckwell.

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All information was correct at the time of writing, please check things like entry costs and opening times before you arrive.

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Comments:


Max Ashmole
22nd of June 2023 @ 15:47:39

The fishing here will be limited soon. As to the amount of litter left by a lot of the fishermen. We have bee very kind to let people fish here for years but the people do not treat the place with respect. We own the top half. And the little Loch above it.

James Aitcheson.
6th of July 2022 @ 20:05:56

Used to fish here with my dad early to mid 80s. Is it still accessible with the main road built along side? Many memories from this beautiful area.